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Syndication

How Do I Sell During The Coronavirus Outbreak? 

Many industries are affected by the coronavirus pandemic. With that, there are a lot of questions in the sales community about how to move through this season well.  How can you sell while everyone is quarantined and practicing social distancing? 

Scott Romney is a senior account executive at Soci. He loves sales and building relationships. Soci’s goal is to help their clients overcome the challenges that may come from internal alignment or with their local franchise partners. Soci can come in to balance their clients’ social media reviews and  do it using just one platform. 

 

Facing the challenges

Businesses that are sole-ownership need to take special care with protecting their brand. The main challenge that salespeople are facing right now is how to keep doing sales without compromising the health of all involved and their businesses. Most salespeople are now hiding by not calling people or having conversations with their prospects and clients. What these same people need to wake up to, however, is the reality that the economy is not dead.  It’s still going and very much alive. We’re not currently in recession and the economy can still pick up once the pandemic is controlled and managed. 

 

The economy is not dead.  People are still working but they are working differently. 

#COVID19

Understanding the circumstances is imperative to be able to see the opportunity in times of crisis. We all have defining moments in our careers that can change our mindset. You need to ask yourself what these defining moments mean for you. Looking at the challenge brought about by the coronavirus outbreak, ask yourself how this defining moment can change your outlook as a small business. Look at the efficiency and gaps when implementing new flexible working hours and the critical role that social media plays amid COVID-19. Social media isn’t just all fluff but a real lifeline, especially with staying connected to clients.

 

In every crisis, there’s an opportunity. As salespeople, it’s part of the job to take advantage of the online resources and get to work digitally. This means of communication can help businesses inform, educate, and connect with their clients. 



Keep working

Even with the pandemic, 99% of the world’s population are still working. Salespeople can pick up the phone and build relationships with their prospects despite the change in how we do business. You can connect and build value, helping your clients see you as a thought leader by continuing to offer counsel.  There is still an opportunity to help with pain points. 

 

It’s time to have a positive side. The nation has faced far greater challenges in the past but they were overcome. As a sales leader, recognize you can come out of this crisis as a leader and not a lagger. Let your prospects know you are working, even in this dire situation, and keep them informed. Make it your goal to build relationships because only a handful of people are currently moving in that direction.  Take this as an opportunity to grow the business by leaning into your clients. This is a defining moment you can take advantage of. Just keep working. 

 

Change your messaging

Before the virus outbreak, Scott called on prospects with the message they were doing a good job but wanted to share information to further improve their standing on social media. The updated message emphasizes that social media is now a lifeline they need to utilize if they aren’t already there. 

 

For example, a local fitness gym, All Time Fitness, has jumped into the social media scene. Despite being closed down due to the virus, they are now utilizing social media by sharing some exercise tips people can do at home. They are also using FaceTime and offering a personal coaching session. They realize this is a great time to broaden their client base and have a great opportunity to serve people while they are in quarantine. Businesses can now change their messaging to provide a solution to current pain points. 

 

Structure  you deal opportunities

This is a great time to restructure some of your deals and give clients an enticing deal during this difficult time. Sales leaders may need to look at the red tape and their client’s current pain points to better align with existing needs. Updating agreements may be called for. Some questions you might need to investigate include: Can I offer my clients a different structure? Can I break up payment schedules?  Doing this won’t devalue your product. It simply gives you margin to listen to your customers and make adjustments as you’re able.  

 

The long-term changes

This pandemic will change some companies forever. Businesses will have to make necessary adjustments. The important thing is that you can decide to do something and strategize to gain.

 

“How Do I Sell During The Coronavirus Outbreak? ” episode resources

Reach out to Scott Romney via LinkedIn to learn more about Soci, a leading social media management platform to help multi-location businesses. 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1270.mp3
Category:Sales restructuring, Sales Messaging -- posted at: 2:28am EDT

How to build a sales engine that will land massive deals – repeatedly

 

A sales engine is a great strategy to increase your number of closed deals. As a sales manager, how do you build a sales engine to land massive deals for your team? 

 

Nigel Green works with  executive investors and sales leaders of companies to help them scale up faster and smarter. As a sales advisor, he works behind the scenes to ensure that leaders are hitting their targets at the end of the year. Nigel understands that if you don’t relentlessly pursue your craft and coach your team well, you won’t be in the game very long. 

 

The revenue harvest

Nigel coined the  term, Revenue Harvest, in this sales leaders almanac containing the fruits of 15 years of experience. He’s been helping various companies build their sales team faster so investors have a chance to grow their private equity. Sales leaders in this kind of environment need to act fast.

 

When Nigel moved to a farm, an hour outside of the city, he was able to observe the farming community. He realized that leading a sales team was very similar to tending crops. Both can face circumstances that are outside of our control. The farmer knows he’s got to produce a crop but looking at the year, he wonders when it’s going to be too hot or too cold, when it's going to rain, or not. These are elements a farmer can’t control but he can’t be paralyzed by the uncontrollables. He’s got to get to work. 

 

In Revenue Harvest, Nigel shows sales leaders how to yield results year-in and year-out that are consistent.  Nigel has broken this down into seven principles a sales leader can follow. 

 

Create a plan

The first principle in the Revenue Harvest helps sales leaders understand what a plan really is and how to do it well. Most sales people don’t have a plan. They’ve been given a plan by their leader but they haven’t pushed back in areas where it’s not realistic.  Leaders need buy-in from the influencers on their team and it needs to be implemented in a time period that will be effective, before the first quarter. Sales leaders have a responsibility to not only assign the revenue and targets of the plan to the sales rep, but also to the customers.

 

The plan also has to account for the metrics that are important to the business. Only the sales leader can make sure that everybody on the team is spending their time well and score-carding. The leader needs to incentivize the team in a way that is aligned with the CEO or COO’s goals. Oftentimes, time isn’t a salesperson’s friend but with planning, time can be used more efficiently. 

 

Planning for adversity

The truth is, most people don’t plan for adversity.  We plan the year assuming that everything is going to be perfect. We don’t plan for the person who is going to quit or go on maternity leave and we don’t plan for competitors to launch a new product. Most sales leaders don’t expect adversity but the truth is, it can come when we least expect it. 

 

A real plan accounts for adversity. The first step in planning is to ask when the budgest season starts. The budget season is a common language in private equity companies. This season typically falls in September or October. By that time, the heads of the company want to see a completed budget expenses revenue target, if new reps need to be hired, etc.. As a proactive leader, you want to go to the heads of the company to get a sense of what it is they want you to accomplish, what resources they’re going to give you throughout the year, and negotiate if it doesn’t sound feasible. Sales leaders have the responsibility of making sure that adequate resources are in play to hit the numbers.

 

Positioning 

Positioning is two-fold. Before you finalize the sales plan, identify your sales influencers and run the plan by them. No matter how good a plan seems to be, it’s wise to receive feedback from the members of your sales team who know the climate of the sales team and can offer information about whether or not a plan is viable. 

 

No one can predict the future but there are two practices that can help mitigate unforeseen disasters: First, look at what the team has done over the past couple years in detail. If the business is affected by seasonality, it’s important to look at history by weeks, maybe even days. Check the spikes during busy seasons. If you’re in retail, Saturdays and Sundays are huge. Look at what was actually accomplished. You tend to create a better plan when you see the circumstances that have influenced your sales historically. 

 

Second, look at the lost selling days. A sales leader needs to figure out how you want to track lost selling days that don’t include national holidays or PTO.  An example might be one of your sales team members not being able to meet her customers due to unforeseen circumstances like a snowstorm that shut down all the roads. You need to figure out a mechanism to track these days and start reducing the days you implement into your plan because of these historically lost sales days.

Preventing a mutiny

With every salesperson being different, not all strategies will work for all people.  There is still an opportunity to reach people even if you have to contend with bad attitudes.  Allow them to sit with you and share their thoughts. Listen to what they have to say even if it’s not something you’re able to implement.  Many people just want to be heard and feel they are part of the process. 

 

If you do decide to use their idea, then you have the chance to enlist them in the work and implementation. The team is then positioned well and fortified in areas that you may not have had a lot of influence.

 

Restore

We live in a world of grind and hustle. We all have that influencer we follow for inspiration. This is a world where people are struggling with mental health, addiction, and many other blocks that get in the way of peak performance. This grinding mentality is a slippery slope to some of the real epidemics we’re facing. 

 

A farmer knows he can’t work a piece of land over and over and never let it rest. It needs restoration. It is the same way with people. You can’t work people hard 12 months a year, leave their families, and be on the road without building in time to let them recuperate.  Don’t forget to give yourself restoration as well. When everyone comes back, the team is stronger. 

 

Tend 

Planting seeds doesn’t guarantee a harvest. The magic happens between planting, prospecting, and closing. #TheSalesProcess

 

We all have the prospecting techniques, the SDR teams, the inbound and outbound, and more. We have a team for every phase but may dwell enough on the in-betweens which include the process, the way we segment the customers to support nurturing the leads, and taking care of our customers until they’re ready to buy.  

 

Segmenting the market 

Oftentimes, salespeople create these arbitrary lines of segmentation, these boundary lines that don’t make sense. The best way to segment customers how they buy which is not something that we normally do. Salespeople hand off a customer multiple times which slows down deal velocity. You take them away from someone they love and hand them to a new person at a certain stage of the funnel. This is harder and more frustrating for them. When a customer is ready to buy, let them purchase things the way they want. 

 

“How to build a sales engine that will land massive deals – repeatedly” episode resources

Read the book the Revenue Harvest to learn more. True leadership is about consistency over time, consistency and action, consistency in values, and consistency and execution over time. This is just not in one year, not in one quarter. You have to recognize that your career is a series of seasons and if you don't treat it that way, you won’t have a very long career. 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1269.mp3
Category:Sales Process, Sales Planning -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

How To Close More Deals Using Videos Throughout The Sales Process

 

Closing deals using videos is now becoming a very effective tool in the sales process. As a salesperson and an entrepreneur, we’ll talk about how you can incorporate videos into your sales goals. 

 

Doug Davidoff works with companies in the B2B space around customer acquisition and success programs. They examine a company’s sales structure to figure out how to build it in a way that’s scalable, repeatable, a high probability yield, high-margin, and high-growth.  Because of this, a sales team can get more done in less time. 

 

The beginning 

Doug started working for the company when he was just 16 years old, around the same time when he got his driver’s license. Back then, they were focused on traditional sales advisory sales training. For the last seven years, they’ve been looking into the holistic process of customer acquisition. Every three years, they reinvent themselves in an effort to make it easier for companies to work with ease and efficiency. 

 

It was difficult when they first started using videos. They were among the first companies who were utilizing this new tech and there were only a handful of examples  they could use as reference. Doug came up with the idea of making videos the same way as he made webinars, breaking them down into 3 sections. Next to blogging, it was by far his greatest accidental discovery.

 

If you decide to work with videos, know that it may not yield immediate results.  Doug didn’t start with video thinking it would enhance the process. There is a lot of divergence when it comes to what people know about using video, what they are looking for, and what they want to accomplish.  Because of this, initial conversations were hard because it was hard to tell a client the specific impact to their sales. Nowadays, with more history, it is easier to see that video is very effective. 

 

Creating the videos 

Doug began creating a 20-minute long video for a presentation and later went to an hour, sometimes longer, as needed. Doug’s colleagues advised that prospects wouldn’t watch videos that were this long but Doug wasn’t to be deterred. As Doug gained a greater skill set and his videos improved, the more the videos were shared among key people within the companies he was targeting. This sharing process enabled Doug’s team to know who the key figures, influencers, and decision makers were within these companies. They began seeing that people were watching their videos even before they got to their kick-off.  These prospects were watching and using their videos to socialize and share various ideas. This was how they decided to use their videos in segments that could be dropped in each part of the sales process, from market development to customer acquisition. 

 

The video sales process

How a customer is moved through the video process largely depends on how the customer finds Doug.  The first video is typically post-discovery where they let their prospects watch any number of videos that are connected to solution pages. 

 

They’ve also tried running a couple of campaigns where they connect to prospects who are difficult to reach by giving them shorter versions of their videos. They ask these recipients to share their top three biggest challenges and Doug’s team then sends a 2-4 minute video that addresses these challenges. This strategy is used during the pre-discovery and discovery process, needs assessment diagnosis, and so on. 

 

Using videos in sales

Doug has been told that videos won’t work in sales but he’s proven this isn’t true. If you are a salesperson presenting a topic consistently, you can save time by putting that presentation into a video.  If you prefer initial contact to be live, you can still utilize video in the follow-up. Doing a concept video is also encouraged.     

 

With great editing, the best thing about video is that you get to be yourself, without mistakes. You can also send the video before the sales call and then ask them what part of the video had the most impact on them. This will give you an idea of what you can do for next steps and you’ll be able to gauge if the video was watched at all. If they did watch the video, the conversation will show you how to prepare for any follow-up conversations. 

 

When you offer a video, your prospects are able to watch you at their convenience. It gives them time to think and prepare for your call as well. 

 

Prospect conversions using videos 

Doug doesn’t claim the videos are the only thing that leads to closing a sale but it is a great indicator.  Video helps to detect how serious someone is about starting a buying journey. Even when people don’t watch the video, you can do more by investigating further: Maybe they don’t believe the video is working. Maybe their  problem isn’t a huge concern. Maybe it’s not a good time/ Maybe they’re in the middle of a crisis that needs to be addressed first. 

 

Videos give you information about the buyer. It allows you to gain greater insight and use your time more effectively. When you free up time, you’re able to close more deals. Doug found out that people loved the video strategy. It is difficult to get people on the phone but Doug’s team saw how these videos could get beyond CFOs. As people got to be a part of how they got information, meeting opportunities grew. 

 

What should be in the videos 

There are three videos that everyone must have. The first video is the Problem Video Challenge. When you help a client understand what the problem is, it helps to separate you from your competition. How they define the problem determines how they’re going to behave. 

This first video is all about communicating the real problem, why it’s a problem, and why it’s so hard to solve.

 

The second video is the Story Video. It’s both yours and the clients’ story, with the client being the origin of that story. In the second video you address how you’re going to solve the problem. You can have multiple problems and story videos depending on who you’re talking to and what the context of the situation is. 

 

The third video is the Three-Minute Brief. It’s a video where you need to have multiple versions. This video is where you’re going to lay-out everything including the action points you want to talk about and how they can impact your client’s goals. Video is definitely a medium you can use to become a more flexible salesperson. The more you do the better you will get. 

 

Video is not the cure-all but it is a medium and tactic that gives you the flexibility to do what you’re trying to do. #SalesVideos

 

“How To Close More Deals Using Videos Throughout The Sales Process” episode resources

Get in touch with Doug. Visit his site and his blog. You can also drop him a message on LinkedIn and Twitter. 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1268.mp3
Category:Sales Videos, Closing Deals -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

How To Find Government Sales Opportunities Without Selling To The Government

 

Salespeople are known for their tenacity and passion to sell but one opportunity that can be overlooked is selling to the government.  

 

Jack Siney worked for the Navy on the F18 Fighter Jet Program and after this experience, moved to entrepreneurial companies and tech industries where he worked for public safety agencies. One such agency installed software in laptops that are in police vehicles across the country. Jack may have started in the government but has now been an entrepreneur for the last 25 years helping the government process more efficiently. 

 

Challenges in Selling to the Government  

There is a long list of stereotypes on why doing business with the government isn’t a good idea. Many think that the government is hard to deal with because of all the red tape involved, making the process take a long time. It’s true that in every stereotype, there’s a kernel of truth. However, the government has grown and has modernized. There are now many opportunities that salespeople aren’t taking advantage of because of these misconceoptions. Selling to the government has actually become much more streamlined.

 

Biggest Prospect in the World 

Government is a great opportunity for salespeople as it’s one of the biggest prospects in the world. Let’s talk about what makes the government a unique prospect. 

 

Large and long-lasting contracts

 

Government contracts are typically large and run for multiple years. Putting in the effort in trying to earn a government contract can help stabilize the revenue of your business. 

 

The government always pays 

The government always pays. There’s always a risk in doing business with private companies.  There are some who won’t pay for your products or services and will hold up your revenue. However, that’s not true when you sign a contract with the government. 




Helps recession-proof your business

Even when there is a recession, the government will still spend for the things that benefit its citizens. As a result, even if there is a recession, if you have a product that can be used, your company can be better protected. 

 

Getting the government contract

The government is just like any other prospect. You still need to do the standard prospecting, build relationships, and close deals. Another advantage in working with the government is that there are multiple ways the government makes a purchase. It’s no longer just going over the RFP process, in fact, 80% of the $20 million the government spends per day doesn’t go to an RFP process.

 

Jack helps companies by giving them the data they need to make good decisions about which agencies to pursue and the type of procurement they need to use. As already mentioned, there are nine ways that a government procures things outside the normal bidding process. They are: 

 

  • Sole source. This means that if a company has a patent and can sole source the patent, the government agency can buy the patent. 
  • Piggyback. When a company has a government contract, another company/agency can purchase off that contract. 
  • Discretionary spending. Every government agency has an amount of money they can spend without having to go through an RFP bidding. It works like a slush fund for an office. 
  • P-Card or a purchase card. A lot of people working for the government have a P card (with a limit) assigned to them. When the product or service falls below the P-card limit, then someone can  purchase whatever you’re selling up to the limit. 
  • Set aside. This is a set aside budget that’s for socio economic classification, regardless of who owns it. It may be a woman-owned, a minority-owned business or an organization for disabled Americans. 

 

  • GSA schedule. General Services Administration
  • State schedule 
  • Co-ops
  • Simplified quotes. This is when the government needs an item and they award the contract to the lowest bidder. 

 

 

These are the nine ways a government can make purchases and procurements. The more qualified you are, the more likely you are to avoid the bid via the RFP process. If you qualify on any of the nine ways, the government can just pick your agency and sign the deal with you. 

 

What’s the GSA schedule? 

The GSA at the federal level watches all the government agencies’ purchases. Companies can go through the process of being included in the GSA schedule. For example, several government agencies can purchase computers at different price points  despite them being the same model and unit. When this happens, the GSA comes in with a schedule so that new companies with their own pricing can join and offer their products to be put on the schedule. They don’t have to bid an RFP. 

 

Get a flagship agency 

The best way for salespeople to flourish when selling to the government is through a flagship agency. Find out how that agency purchases and then try to work your product into their normal process. Instead of shooting for all agencies, focus on that one that will put in a good word for you to other agencies.  In working with the government, it’s still important to build relationships, especially with your flag ship agency. In two to three year’s time, your reach will have grown due to the references given by your flagship. This relationship becomes critical to the growth and reputation of a business. 

 

Get a local press

After your flagship agency is launched, you’ll want  to get local press for the agency. These news outlets love stories that talk about how their government is saving money, making things easier for their citizens, and are working more efficiently. Once the story has been published, share that to all the surrounding agencies. New prospects feel safer with companies who have gotten good press and are more likely to work with you.

 

Sell in circles 

Agencies don’t want to take risks and want to know how other agencies have purchased. When you have your flagship agency in place, you can then start selling and marketing to other agencies as well as to smaller towns. Your flagship agency will do the endorsing for you. 

 

Jack Siney’s company has a database of what the government purchases. The government literally buys everything from whiskey, to condoms, to sales training. There’s a lot of opportunity for salespeople who are ready to sell to the government.  Get your organization comfortable with the idea. The government always pays and you just may have the next product it needs.  

 

Selling to the government is still an option. Don’t get caught up in the stereotypes and miss an opportunity. #GovernmentSales

 

“How To Find Government Sales Opportunities Without Selling To The Government” episode resources

Find out more about Jack Siney and his agency by going to govspend.com.

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1267.mp3
Category:Government, Sales -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Rethinking The Way You Do Sales Automation

 

What do you think of sales automation? Is it a go or a no for you? Perhaps it’s time you rethink the way you do sales automation. 

 

Gessie Schechinger works for a company called OnCourse, a brand new sales engagement platform. Most of his life, he’d been a professional peddler, jumping from one sales job to another. He started his career in sales with cold calls, went on to a territory sales job, then became an account manager. From there, he got a taste of CRM. Now with his current team, they’re sharing a tool they’ve created that is helpful for salespeople to automate. Their goal is to use the sales professionals’ skill set and automate those skill sets for a more efficient outreach. 

 

Selling smart using automation 

OnCourse is a tool that helps salespeople to automate responsibly. The tool helps to ensure that your emails have accurate presentations, the right address, and all the other information and variables needed for impactful engagement. 

 

In addition to that, this tool also looks at when people are going to engage and when they do engage, how long does it take for them to actually engage with the pitch. TAPO is a company that does outreach reporting. They research 280 - 300 large corporations and look at their sales outreach. Using that outreach study report, they can see what methods are effective. 

 

Included in the study, is information about how long it takes for a person to engage and from there, how long it takes for them to buy. The report is important especially for service-based businesses and software-based businesses where people tend to communicate in different ways. To figure out the communication channel the clients respond to, you need to make contact in various areas. This is how automation works,as it helps you throw out big nets. The automation is used as a warm-up tool to prepare prospects for engagement and purchase. 

 

The automation allows you to create awareness. While your first automated emails are typically deleted, your next emails have a greater chance to get engagement, when they look at your product or services. 

 

You have to expect that your first few emails will be deleted. Persistence will put you in a better position down the road. #SalesAutomation

 

LinkedIn outreach 

The other type of automation is LinkedIn automation. LinkedIn automation and selling is what Gessie refers to as a delicate dance. There are people on LinkedIn who will just connect automatically and immediately throw up their entire value proposition. That may work on some but it’s not typical.

 

People want to use LinkedIn as a networking tool where they can build connections but you have to keep in mind the spirit of the platform, especially if you’re going to use LinkedIn in for sales. It’s true you can speak with your prospects directly and there’s an advantage to seeing titles and experience, but there nuance is needed in the approach. 

 

One approach is the 2x2 rule, which means, take two minutes to find two things. Create an interaction and use automation in LinkedIn that will allow you to reach out to 10 - 20 people in a day. Taking the time to learn personal information about your prospects will allow your engagement to have a personal touch. 

 

OnCourse against other automation tools

There are a number of automation tools available out there that offer many of similar features to one another.  OnCourse is unique in the way that it’s built around their clients’ existing successes. The tool takes the business process and amplifies that to make it as configurable as possible. 

 

OnCourse is more self-contained than other companies. It has a built-in phone system, a LinkedIn automation, built-in Chrome plugin, built-in texting, and more. The other two reasons that make the tool unique is its ability to niche down and it provides you with outreach education. This tool is especially useful if you have a unique business with solid sales processes.

 

Gessie’s tool allows you to hold information about a client but is also for pipeline management. It studies and understands where you are winning, why and how you can duplicate these efforts. The process is usually: 

 

  • Sending general emails about your company
  • Reach out on LinkedIn
  • Sending follow-up messages
  • Setting up a personal task (i.e. sending a personal message in the middle of email automation)
  • Interact via a phone call

 

“Rethinking The Way You Do Sales Automation” episode resources

Learn more about OnCourse or email Gessie Scheginger via his mail Gessie@tryoncourse.com. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1266.mp3
Category:Sales Automation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Think Like A Large Company CEO

 

Regardless of the size of your company, thinking like the CEO of a larger company will help you better visualize where you are going and how you’re going to get there. 

 

Vicki Antonio is a business consultant and life coach. She started working for startup companies when she was just 13 years old. Her experience with startups taught her the pattern of growing pains which she then used when she fell into the real estate industry. Vicki’s work helped her gain a deeper knowledge of the entrepreneurial spirit and gain a business acumen. At one point, she went into upper management and real estate but when the industry came back, she ended up being a business developer for a global real estate franchise. 

 

That work allowed her to manage 30 shops where her main role was to develop the shop, make it brand compliant, and develop partnerships with brokers. She was a business coach for these shops and helped these businesses become profitable. All the skills she learned from working came into play. The experience eventually led Vicki to launch her own coaching business. 

 

Top problems faced by small businesses

 

FEAR 

Small businesses must overcome fear. It comes into play when the business has been built to a certain point and then gets stagnant. It can feel like the same fear that parents get when they take their kids to daycare for the first time. There's an apprehension because of the emotional attachment parents have for their child. When a business has to relinquish what it knows, it’s like turning over the reins to someone else. Instead of trusting the people who’ve come to help, these businesses fear them. Even when it’s just a system they need to engage with, fear can be a major hindrance to advancing.

 

CLARITY 

Entrepreneurs are self-employed salespeople. There are a lot of things that are in play in order for goals to be met. Oftentimes, entrepreneurs don’t have the clarity about what these things are. Sometimes they don’t have enough components to reach the end. Other times, they have too many components and can become confused about which ones to use. 

 

Even the best athletes, like Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods, had coaches. Their coaches gave them a bird’s eye view of the areas that they couldn’t see themselves. Their coaches critiqued them and analyzed what they were doing.  They could then help these athletes change little things to help them improve.

 

The same is true in sales. Sales coaches help businesses with the things they need to see. They are the ones who analyze the system they’re currently using, analyze the tools and make sure they are being used correctly. In this stage, it is imperative for the businesses to trust the process. 

 

Overcoming fear

F.E.A.R. can be seen as an acronym - false evidence appearing real. Sometimes salespeople can get in their own heads. This is the result of not having clarity about the direction they are going or if they are doing things the right way. A lot of times, salespeople are presented and marketed outside of what they know to be right. They are presented with various services that try to rush the process. Trying to rush through, and not developing any real, advancing skill, can keep them from moving forward. 

 

Most of Vicki’s clients are already leaders in their fields. They've been accepted by their clients. but they know how difficult the climb has been. It’s when they reach a certain pinnacle that they start to fear: do we trust this new product, this new technique, this new person? 

 

Attacking your fear

Everyone has a level of fear they aren’t willing to go beyond. There can be a great reward waiting for the risk takers but everyone has to calculate the risk to the place of comfortability and faith. 

 

Build the trust

The business is an entrepreneur's baby. They’ve put their hearts into it and invested so much. It’s their responsibility to keep it growing and cared for. It gets difficult when someone comes in claiming that they will take care of their business just as well and ensure its growth. Trusting people isn’t an easy thing to do but if you have people who have your same core values, and people who have a successful track record of being able to do what they promised, there’s a better chance to trust when doing business. 

 

Getting to know these people and engaging with them will help build trust. It’s important to build relationships, vet who they are, and check their track record. If they were able to do it for themselves and other companies, it is more likely they can do it for you too. 

 

Big companies can also prove their credibility to clients with third-party validation in order to encourage use of their services and offerings. Using testimonials and LinkedIn recommendations is another referral opportunity. Social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to market your services has also proven effective. 

 

Clarity 

Clarity comes with knowing who you’re working with and what they’ve been able to do and it’s also about knowing who and what you are as a business. This requires knowledge of:

  • Your niche
  • The market
  • The strength of your business
  • What you want to highlight about yourself

 

Knowing who you are helps you figure out how to work with others. You can’t just hop in a car heading to a destination without mapping out how to get there.  Business is the same way. Startups tend to think they can be all things to all people but this is just not possible. 

 

For someone to advance it may be that they need to let go of an old mindset.  Once they are clear about where they want to be it will be easier for you to know the best way to support their goals. It is important to know your niche and know your ideal customer. 

 

Salespeople can be a jack of all trades who see the opportunities because they are in sales. In truth, whenever you say yes to something, you’re actually saying no to something else . You are literally impeding your progress. You can only spend money and time once so pick the thing that will maximize your investment. Your time has more value than the actual money you’re trying to make. 

 

Remember, not all money is good money. #SalesTruth

 

Clarity is knowing where you are heading and that means knowing the season you’re in. When you’re in an elevator and headed to the beach,you don’t get offended when somebody wearing an overcoat steps on the elevator with you. You don’t feel like you’re missing out because you know you’re going in a different direction. 

 

“Think Like A Large Company CEO” episode resources

As a salesperson, just trust the process. There will be blindspots in the process but you need to have faith. Know that if you’ve done the preparation, you’re clear about where you’re heading, you’ve done the training, and checked that your system is working then all that’s left to do is  take that leap of faith. 

 

Get in touch with Vicki via her digits: 561-7741-333. Her website is also getting ready for launch at www.victorious.com and Victoria’s Lifestyle Strategies. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought in part to you by the Sales Success Summit, an event put up by Scott Ingram in Austin, Texas. The Sales Summit will be on October 14-15 this year. Get a chance to meet and interact with successful entrepreneurs and salespeople. 

This episode is brought to you in part by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1265.mp3
Category:Building trust, Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

You Can't Sell Value If You Don't Value Yourself

 

Salespeople come from a variety of industries but the one thing they have in common: They all sell value. It can be a challenge, however, to sell something you don’t have yourself. Simply speaking, as salespeople, we can only sell value if we value ourselves. 

 

Jenean Merkel Perelstein is a business and sales anthropologist who uses scientific techniques to help salespeople close the cultural gap between them and their prospects, clients, and the organizations they are working with. Her job is to help them understand the cultural approach and take advantage of it. 

 

Defining value 

Value often gets mixed up with values which are the standards or qualities we deem as worthwhile. Value is what we put out into the world, what we offer in exchange. It then becomes part of the larger conversation about money, prosperity, and playing in this market economy. Value becomes part of the interwoven concepts that have to be considered together. 

 

When we stand in strength with our values, it means we understand the true qualities and the true standard that we deem worthwhile to offer in the marketplace. If you’re not stepping into that sense of value and you haven’t done the thought process of figuring out what it is in the first place, then you’re basically starting the conversation a little bit behind. 

 

Knowing your worth 

You need to know your beliefs and what’s possible and not possible for you. This includes knowing your attitudes, state of mind, and feelings. All of these things build together into a larger concept of knowing your worth and taking ownership of your work. Doing that will enable you to come forth and articulate the worth and value of whatever you are representing. 

 

Regardless of the words you speak, the cultural interactions you have with other people will be part of the underlying conversation. The energy you exchange in your conversation can expose whether or not you are operating from a place of desperation or a lack of confidence. Clients see this right away.  If this is you, there is foundational work that needs to take place.

 

People that have been unsuccessful for a long time start to wear an air of desperation. It becomes harder for them to meet another client or go to another meeting. If you are managing this type of person, there’s an opportunity to talk to them about standing in their strength, taking ownership, and changing their direction. Salespeople have to look at the value they offer, not just transactional value, but value as human beings as they bring what makes them unique and special into the conversation. 

 

Build your value

As an individual, you can start building value by looking at your own personal strength inventory. Look for the red flags that are holding yourself back from being able to understand and articulate your value. 

 

Jenean looks at all this through an anthropological lens, the cultural lens. She sees each individual as a culture of one and looks into the attributes of that culture. Starting there helps her client understand their own personal strengths and enables them to build on how to shore up their foundations. 

 

Doing this on yourself will then help you to start recognizing the cultural attributes of your prospects, future clients, and the organization that you’re hoping to go deeper with. You’ll be able to see the gaps between your cultural attributes and their cultural attributes. The closer you can close the gaps, the easier the sales conversations will be. 

 

Attributes that make up a culture

There are four primary attributes that make up a culture: attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and values. The first,  attitudes, can change quickly. Attitudes affect your state of mind and your feelings. The attitude can change based on your mood and outlook. The second attribute, behaviors, needs to be consistently evaluated for opportunities to change based on the needs of the client.  Beliefs, the third attribute can be conscious or subconscious. The brain operates within our beliefs to protect us and to keep things normal. Evaluate if it’s these beliefs that are creating a ceiling to your success. The fourth attribute, values, is what could bridge the gap between you and your client. 

 

Jenean asks her clients to journal a deep inventory of these attributes around their career, finances, thoughts about their abilities to make money, and how they take care of their relationships. When you have these  attributes in common with another person or group, then add on norms and traditions, you have a culture. Every workplace has its own culture.

 

Do an inventory 

Knowing your value means doing an inventory of what makes you special and unique, and what you may struggle with. Once you do that, you will begin to recognize where you are holding yourself back. You can then identify the work you need to do to get better and articulate your value in future meetings.  

 

There are times when the work culture is dominated by someone who is highly regarded. Sales leaders and people who have stayed in the company for a long time can influence the culture, even when their outcomes aren’t good. A toxic influence can mess up the productivity of the sales team. Start digging and see if the culture enhances the productivity and the positivity of your workplace and team.  If not, it’s worth investigating the origin. 

 

As a salesperson, also start identifying the people of influence in your target organization so  you know the people where you can make the greatest impact. 

 

Keep a success journal

Jenean shares that it is important for salespeople to keep an ongoing success journal. Culture teaches us not to be arrogant so we tend to dismiss compliments and praise. The brain, however, remembers and listens. The success journal is an opportunity to recognize when you’ve done a good job.  It offers the brain evidence that you’re capable.  

 

When we don’t validate ourselves internally, we can start telling our brains that we don’t value our successes.  To compensate for that, we can start looking for external validation, which will eventually let us down. Keeping a journal of your successes will help you overcome these inevitable obstacles. It’s imperative to occupy your brian with these successes to help you move forward and push through your boundaries. Reading your success journal right before a sales conversation will compel you to focus on your successes and you’ll find that the conversation will go smoother and yield better results. 

 

“You Can't Sell Value If You Don't Value Yourself” episode resources

The more work that an individual of influence can do to challenge their own limiting beliefs, the more adaptable they can become in moments of change. #SalesValues

 

Create your personal inventory now. Visit the official site of Stand In Your Strength for a free resource on how to start making your own inventory. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1264.mp3
Category:Sales Value -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Where Sellers Get Stuck

 

Sometimes sellers get stuck but where exactly do they get stuck?

 

Umar Hameed was previously working in Silicon Valley where he worked for high-tech launching companies from Asia, Europe, and the Valley into the U.S. market. He noticed that there were employees in the company who were rockstars in the sales department. Others, however, would invest in training, motivation, coaching, and incentives where they’d only improve a little bit. Still others would improve a lot but for only a short amount of time. Umar saw how the problem wasn’t in the sales training, process, or strategy. The problem was with the people and their mindset.

 

Umar’s work entails looking for ways to give salespeople an owner’s manual for their mindset in order to change their world.

 

Getting the team together 

This can be applied to the sales team and the whole organization. It’s imperative to change the mindset of individuals because that’s how you shift the entire company and improve its trajectory. Consider:

  • How you can win
  • How you can beat the competition
  • How you can support each other

 

Changing the mindset of the organization can produce a work environment where everyone is enthusiastic and passionate. This, in turn, will boost the morale of your sales team and increase their speed. 

 

The author of the comic strip called Pogo wrote this quote: We have met the enemy and the enemy is us. Oftentimes you may think that the enemy is the economy or the competition. The truth is, how you feel about yourself at a subconscious level determines how well you do. The only way to truly improve is to change the mindset. Umar’s job is to give people the tools to do just that. 

 

Getting unstuck 

Umar had a client, Paul, when he first started his career in the mindset space. Paul was a sales rep from the east coast who had been hitting way above the quota but he still approached Umar for coaching an area he was lacking confidence:  asking for referrals. The sales rep was an excellent closer but always hit a block when it came to asking his client for the referral. Umar asked Paul to tell him about a time when he asked for a referral badly. Umar says when a client goes back to these memories, the body will offer clues to what happened. As Paul went back to that moment, Umar asked him what he felt at that moment.  Paul answered that he felt weird. It was an uncomfortable feeling. Paul then remembered a time when he was a child his father had a friend over. Paul overheard his father tell this friend that real men don’t ask for help. Paul’s hero was his father so little Paul took that statement to heart. As a sales rep, Paul was subconsciously remembering that statement when he thought of asking for a referral.  His mindset considered it asking for help and Paul’s subconscious was reminding him of his father’s words. Once Paul realized that, he was able to change his mindset and has been able to ask for referrals comfortably. 

 

Changing your core belief 

You have to let go of the core beliefs instilled in your brain that keep you from becoming more successful. 

 

After training, you may change for a week but you’ll revert to old habits if you don’t address the underlying belief that’s keeping you from changing your mindset. You want to be able to show up to your meetings with the consistent confidence that comes from permanent and sustainable change.  

 

Many people have a variety of skill sets but there tends to be a tendency to focus on their weaker areas. It keeps them from realizing their strengths and stepping out as their best selves. When you can get to the core reasons why these weaknesses turn up, they can be addressed and conquered. 

 

If you don't address the underlying negative belief systems, you'll revert back to those old behaviors and still be stuck. #SalesGoals

 

Launching the NeuroBoosterz App

Umar has been helping people find their true potential by providing them with the necessary tools in his app, NeuroBoosterz. He has created audio tracks that use applied neuroscience to take his clients through a thought process that improves their subconscious outlook. It helps people change their mindset exactly when they need it to help them show up as stronger and more powerful individuals in whatever situation needs a boost of confidence.

 

The app comes in several categories including: 

  • Sales Mindset
  • Confidence and Motivation
  • Life’s Ups and Downs
  • Health and Wellness
  • Transformation
  • Sleep and Relaxation

 

A free sample on his app is called Mind Movie. When a person goes to a sales meeting, Umar asks them how confident they are that they’re going to do great in their appointment. The Mind Movie will get you to really think about what you want to accomplish in your next meeting. It will get you to think at a much higher level and see how you can improve what you’re about to do. 

 

NeuroBoosterz is grounded in a science that helps you learn a technique to take charge of your mind. 

 

Sales Success Story with NeuroBoosterz

Doug Miller was a successful salesman when he found Umar.. He had a problem waking up consistently for his morning run.  It was a problem because Doug realized his sales day were better on the days he ran. They got together for a 15-minute phone consultation to make a personalized neuro boost. For Doug, Umar framed it around a moral imperative. Umar used a mental pattern and created a six and a half minute track that Doug could listen to. Now Doug wakes up at 4:45 and runs by 5 AM. As a result, Doug’s sales days are better and his stats have improved dramatically. 

 

Another benefit of the NeuroBoosterz app is it can help families connect better at home. There’s a tendency for parents to be so stressed and overwhelmed with their work that even when they’re home, they’re not mentally checked in with the kids. Under the category, Life’s Ups and Downs, Umar has a track that parents can listen to in the driveway to alleviate the stress they’ve brought home from work. Once they’ve decompressed, they’re able to  go join their families with a better attitude and be more available. 

 

Change for the better 

We all have the ability to change our mindset. Tools like NeuroBoosterz can empower you to do that. 

 

“Where Sellers Get Stuck” episode resources

Visit the site of NeuroBoosterz and sign up. The app is only for $12.99/month and $99.99/year. They also create personalized new boosters for you. 

 

Do you have more interesting sales stories? Let Donald know! Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1263.mp3
Category:Stuck sellers -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Equaling The Playing Field For Women In Sales 

 

Sales used to be a man’s world, used to. The same can’t be said now because women have found their place in the sales industry as well. 

 

Lorraine Ferguson is one of the great saleswomen. She started her career in the industry in the mid-eighties by working for a startup company. Like many women, she didn’t see herself as a salesperson but her job for the startup company called for it and Lorraine ended up joining a team of salesmen. 

 

Lorraine’s challenges 

Lorraine was young and inexperienced so she did what she could by imitating what she saw the salesmen were doing. With so much pressure sales, the job didn’t seem appealing. Sales were all about making the deal and sharing the benefits and features of the products and services. Lorraine did what she could but the biggest challenge wasn’t selling. It was her gender. Lorraine felt that she wasn’t taken seriously and several times during a negotiation, she was asked to bring in her boss. 

 

It wasn’t just her lack of experience and knowledge that became a challenge. She was also conducting herself based on the way she was raised. She was taught that being a good girl meant being accommodating, knowing her place, and waiting her turn. Lorraine didn’t immediately realize that she was carrying all these lessons as she became a sales person. When somebody told her to jump, she’d say, “How high?” She just wasn’t being treated as an equal and she wasn’t acting like one.

 

Women and sales 

People have developed a negative view towards sales, women included. It’s not a career you immediately want to join or take a part in. This is the mindset that many people have toward sales. Women are also not told encouraged to join sales as a potential career, especially by your guidance counselor. People don’t typically see sales as an option. 

 

Another reason why women don’t perceive sales as a possible career is the hiring process. Men are still the favored gender because the majority of the sales leader positions are occupied by men. Women aren’t seen as a fit for sales. A lot of people look at sales as a stepping stone or last resort. It’s the mindset that if you’ve got nothing else to do, then try sales. 

 

This, of course, isn’t true. There is so much more to sales and it can be a very profitable career. As a profession, it’s very flexible, and women have many natural strengths that are needed by today’s sales professionals. 

 

Convincing the saleswoman in you

Women can make a big difference in the sales industry for many reasons. They have the right skillset to become successful in this career. It’s not just knowing about the products and services, it’s also about having the natural ability to connect and understand another person. Consumers today are expecting sales people to know about their businesses as much as they know the products and services they sell. 

 

Women have the innate ability to connect the dots when trying to understand a  problem and how they might solve it. Women are great listeners and asking the right questions is always a good start in a sales conversation. When women talk to their bestfriend, they give their attention and they listen. They also ask tough questions to help their friends solve the problems themselves. This can also be used in sales. Women in sales are bringing a lot to the table because they tend to be more concerned about others than they are for themselves. It’s their nature to put others first. Women tend to like to help others and this is what sales is all about. 

 

Other skills women have is their ability to organize and follow through. A woman who wants flexibility, to make their mark, to be a problem solver, and to work on her own schedule is someone who would fit the sales industry perfectly. 

 

Work more, hustle more 

In a male-dominated industry, women have to work harder to prove themselves to the person they are working for. This can be difficult to do but women’s organizational skills help. The truth is that when most sales people think they have a sales process, the reality is that they either have one that doesn’t work or they don’t really have one to begin with. 

 

Women make sure to make a roadmap for their sales process. These questions guide and shape the sales system. 

 

  • What should I do?
  • Where am I trying to go?
  • What’s my end game?

 

Women do things in the right order so they have a high predictability of success. A woman with a process will always win over the salesperson who has no real system. She knows how to start a conversation, gain control, and set expectations. A woman with a sales process understands what it is that she needs to uncover to qualify someone. 

 

Women couple their natural skills with their sales process so there’s no pressure. It’s conversational and disarmingly honest. 

 

Make the change 

Lorraine had an awakening in her sales career. It was during the time when men dominated the industry and one day, she got angry about being ignored. She decided to make a change and she had an unconditional commitment to make that change. 

 

Lorraine would go to her sales calls with a voice in the back of her mind reminding her to be polite, to refrain from asking questions, and to let everybody else go first. She didn’t think of herself as an equal. She had to change that mindset by working on her personal presence. Lorraine looked at her reflection in the mirror and observed her body language and how she was coming across. She started to prepare more for her meetings to be able to take control of the conversation. 

 

Lorraine found that if she practiced and prepared for her meetings, she got better outcomes. She’d meet her clients and with her agenda already planned, she’d take control of the situation right away. The little changes that Lorraine made in her sales process and her personal presence advanced her quickly. She took control from the very beginning of the conversation but then ensured her client that the conversation was collaborative. She wasn’t being aggressive, she was being assertive. 

 

Having the ability to set an agenda made a huge difference for Lorraine and it eventually became an effective habit for her. She also started ending each meeting by sharing her next steps and she saw how her potential clients would sit up in their chairs in anticipation for that next step. 

 

Sometimes we need to ask tough questions, do some nurturing, even do a deeper investigation to solve a client’s problem. #SalesProcess

 

Sales for women then and now 

Unfortunately, not a lot has changed in sales in the way men perceive women in the industry nor has the way women respond to this perception.

 

There’s still some work to do on that front but Lorraine shared that the tide is going to change. This can be credited to how women are showing their male counterparts that they don’t need to sell like a man to be successful in what they do. There’s a level of respect when women are successful. As a woman, Lorraine takes some risks. When she’s uncomfortable, she's upfront about it. The worse case scenario when women take risks is that they don’t get to do business with a potential client. Still, the best case scenario is that they’ll close a deal. Take a chance. Ask the hard-hitting questions and be okay with feeling comfortable.  To make it easier, you can ask, “Can I ask a tough question?”  Buyers are desperate to talk with someone who is willing to really listen and understand what is going on. 

 

The sales industry is still a challenge for women as they get put in uncomfortable circumstances and feel disrespected but they can also stand in their strengths. 

 

“Equaling The Playing Field For Women In Sales” episode resources

Sales is a good fit for both men and women but there are three things that we need to work on: 

  • A mindset towards sales and toward ourselves must be healthy
  • Having a sales process/system in place
  • Having the discipline to do these actions each day. 

Women in sales can level the playing field and be competent in the sales industry if they keep those three things in mind. 

 

Reach Lorraine Ferguson via her email or visit her LinkedIn account. 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1262.mp3
Category:Women in Sales, Sales Success Story -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

How To Pair Inbound Leads With Sales Triggers For Higher ROI

 

Are you thinking of ways you can pair inbound leads with sales triggers to get a higher ROI? In this episode, we’ll talk about how to do just that. 

 

Tukan is the CEO and co-founder of LeadSift. It is an intent data platform for B2B technology companies. Tukan's company helps them identify which accounts and which contacts within the accounts they should be going after based on signals of intent. 

 

What is an inbound lead?

For Tukan, an inbound lead is anyone who comes into your website and fills out a form on gated content, requests a demo, or in other ways your website offers engagement. Other inbound leads may have come to you, chatted with you and given you their email address.  They could have also downloaded your webinar, your ebook, or another offering. If a person requests some form of information from your company, that is considered an inbound lead. 

 

There’s a variety of sales triggers, including internal triggers or first party data triggers. These include:

  • The number of pages that were visited
  • Average time they spent on the site
  • Number of downloaded content from the site
  • Number of webinars attended
  • Times they’ve opened an email from you

 

All these are triggers that can offer you insight about how far along your prospects are on the buying journey. Several marketing automation tools such as HubSpot and Marketo provide this information for entrepreneurs. 

 

External sales triggers  

The second type of triggers are the external sales triggers. These are outside your digital properties, not on your landing page and not on your websites. The reality in sales is that less than 1% of your market is coming from your website. Many companies’ activities happen outside of their digital properties. Inbound leads coming from external sources can be broken down to two categories: the company level growth event and the behavioral intent triggers. 

 

The company level growth is when other companies get funding to host certain events. These companies may be hiring specific roles or skills whereby your software and services can be used.

 

As for the behavioral intent triggers, these are triggers coming from other people looking into your products and services.  Make note of the people who are looking at your competitors and your industry. Helpful questions include: 

 

  • Are they researching our competitors or another third party web?
  • Have they been engaging with content you can pick up?
  • Have they been talking to competitors?
  • Are they asking questions on blogs?
  • Have they mentioned their needs in forums?

 

Challenges of inbound sales

Marketing is typically responsible for generating inbound leads and sales people follow up on the leads to create opportunities. However, not all leads are equal and a lot of times, they don’t fit the profile of your ideal clients. Those are easy to spot. Then there are people who fit your target market but that can be where the challenge is because many salespeople mistakenly think of these as equally valuable leads. 

 

Based on stats, only 3% of your target is in the market right now. Without external leads and additional knowledge, the sales development team is just sent on a wild goose chase. It is imperative that they pair these ICP fit inbound leads with some triggers to figure out which ones they need to go after first.  As they are able to prioritize, armed with the right information, the contacts become more meaningful. 

 

Inbound sales that aren’t ready yet can be put on a nurture track.  When salespeople are reaching out to them, they can gauge if the timing is right. Salespeople can then follow up when they’re ready to purchase. 

 

Pairing inbound leads with triggers

There are a lot of tools that try to solve the nuance of pairing inbound leads with triggers but it all boils down to CRM. This is where you can see most of the information you need as a salesperson. 

 

When a lead comes in, it is being captured by your automation system. The lead then syncs with your CRM (Salesforce). When the data is already in your CRM, the marketing automation can log within the lead at the account level. This means that the account marketing can analyze the data and look at the kinds of activities the lead does on the account level. You can then add additional plugins to offer additional information from the base data you got from your CRM. The data includes the activities the lead engaged in on your website, if he attended your event in the last 30 days, if a company has used your tools, hired a new executive in the last 90 days, and more. 

Salespeople can get all this information without much trouble. If they need to do a follow up, the sales rep can just click on the lead and look at their account within the CRM. They can gauge with better accuracy if the lead is worth pursuing based on the data.

 

It is important for salespeople to be trained on how to use CRM so as to avoid following up with leads that won’t turn into a sale. Always look at the account, and not just the individual person, to see the leads with the highest potential. 

 

Reaching out your inbound leads

Sales reps need to be brave when reaching out. There’s no space for being shy in the sales industry. When you are reaching out to your leads, connect with multiple people within the account who you think might fit the same criteria. 

 

Pairing your inbound leads with triggers is especially helpful when a certain lead starts showing interest six months after you put them in your CRM. You may have forgotten about them but because you have the data coming from your CRM and other plugins, you’ll see they are now ready for your services. Sales reps need to spend time following up on inbound leads. When picking up on behavioral intent triggers, sales reps can utilize internal and external triggers. 

 

Tukan’s company LeadSift searches the web and looks for the different kinds of triggers based on the data pushed from your marketing automation and your CRM. When their system spots a trigger event, it shares the information directly to your CRM. This information will tell you if it’s a new lead and if it’s from an old account, it updates the account so that sales reps can follow up. 

 

Don’t waste time and resources on hope. Have solid leads for your sales development team. #SalesLeads

 

“How To Pair Inbound Leads With Sales Triggers For Higher ROI” episode resources

Connect with Tukan and ask about his software by visiting the official website. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1261.mp3
Category:ROI, Leads, Inbound Leads, External and Internal Triggers -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

How To Qualify Your Prospects In Under 10 Minutes

 

How can a salesperson qualify a lead in under 10 minutes? Jason Swenk can help. He is a self-proclaimed professional Uber driver for his children, who are 13 and 9 years old, but his main job is to work with agency owners grow and create freedom in their company.

 

The downstream sales process

The downstream sales process doesn’t start the conversation by immediately selling to a potential client.  Launching a meeting by talking about a product is a tactic many sales reps use but it doesn’t often lead to closing. The downstream sales process is more about taking away the risks and making sure that the transaction works for both parties and ensures both parties have good experiences. 

 

Mistakes that people often do

Oftentimes, people sell their core services right off the bat, and immediately go to the high ticket item regardless if it meets the client’s need. In this scenario a high commission is the goal by trying to capture a major commitment from a client who doesn’t yet see the value in what you’re offering.  You’re trying to sell long term or short-term contracts to people who don’t fit the criteria of your ideal client. For long-term gains, you have to know and find your ideal customer.

 

Knowing the profile of your ideal customers takes a while especially if you are just starting out. You need time to figure out who the ideal client is so you don’t waste time or resources. Conversing with clients who aren’t actually your ideal customers is akin to flirting with someone who you were never meant to have a relationship with. This is caused by both desperation and misplaced optimism, which can be common in sales. 

 

Another mistake that salespeople can make is the failure to ask questions. Salespeople tend to keep talking with statements and forget that the most valuable aspects of the conversation will come from the client answering their questions.  Asking a prospect questions will reveal their pain points, the impact of the problems on their business, and how these problems make them feel. 

 

Identifying the right people

It is important to identify what kind of client you want to work with and getting to know what their biggest challenges are. For example, say you’re an agency that wants to work with lawyers. Which lawyers are you really going after? 

 

 

  • Go for a specific type of lawyer. For example, personal injury attorneys. 
  • After that, take it a step further, and decide to work with personal injury lawyers who are doing pay-per-click paid advertising 

 

 

After you have the most specific profile you can get, it’s time to make a call. When you do, don’t offer everything, just offer a sneak peek. Sell it as a foot-in-the-door service. This strategy takes the pressure off of the new sales guy and the prospects as well.  This benefits both parties because you’re not asking for more than just a small, simple commitment. You’re giving them a slice of the pie instead of giving them the whole pie without even knowing if they like it or not. 

 

To join you, you’re client gets three options:

  • Identify everything you’re doing and lay-out a plan you can execute
  • Lay out a plan, love it, and we will help you out. 
  • Hate the plan and we give you your money back so that you have nothing to lose. 

 

Fixing the problem

A great salesperson thinks two steps ahead. This means that as you are in a meeting, you are already setting up the next one. As you’re walking your potential clients through the front door, help them feel they are already partners in building the plan with you.

 

The next part in the process is fixing the problem through this plan you’re laying out together. Your prospect will already be bought in because they’re helping to create it.

 

When they give the go signal to start the project, everybody on the team should work on it together. This is important in the downstream process because the client is seeing the results. When they start seeing the success from the original plan, the sales person then needs to go back to the client and see what other needs can be taken care of. For example:

 

“Hey! I’m glad you’re getting results. You know, there are a couple of other things that we could do in order to really accelerate this. Are you open to having a conversation about that?” 

 

Since you’ve already earned their trust, you now have the opportunity to pitch your year-to-year retainer and they can still cancel anytime. This foot-in-the-door process is effective since clients are 10 times more likely to pay you again if they’ve already had a successful transaction with you. You’re going to close the deal a lot quicker because what you’re offering is less risky since they’ve already gotten to see a positive outcome. You start at entry level and build from there. 

 

Know that some organizations won’t change and adopt this foot-in-the-door process. If you’re a sales rep working for one of these organizations you have two options. You may decide to try to change the organization or look for another organization that you believe will have a positive impact on your sales career. 

 

As a salesperson, keep testing the process and adapt. Be willing to take in new data in order to change and improve your business and your sales stats. Test out different variations of this blueprint, use it as a framework, and you’ll be fine. 

 

“How To Qualify Your Prospects In Under 10 Minutes” episode resources

Follow Jason Swenk on LinkedIn or visit his site to know more. 

If you want more stories, you can just reach out to Donald. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1260.mp3
Category:Leads, Qualifying Leads -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Best Sellers In History Recap 

 

The Best Sellers in History has been a hit and we’ve been doing it for the last few months. We have highlighted individuals and classified them as the best sellers throughout history. Over the course of the series, we’ve talked about: 

  • Who they are
  • What made them great at selling
  • What separated them from everyone else
  • How we can take those ideas and apply them to our selling career

 

The Recap

In this series, Donald has talked about several individuals who made their mark. They were influential and persuasive people who were able to make a difference in their lifetimes. We’ve talked about Jesus Christ, Oprah Winfrey, Reginald F Lewis, Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Benjamin Franklin, Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa, and Abraham Lincoln. They were amazing sales people even though they weren’t in sales for a living. For example, Abraham Lincoln wasn’t a salesman but he did sell a major idea. 

 

 

  • Abraham Lincoln - sold the whole country on the idea of unity and the need to abolish slavery. 
  • Mother Teresa - sold to the Catholic church the idea of leaving the convent and personally helping the needy to create her own ministry. 
  • Mahatma Gandhi - sold to the whole country the idea of a peaceful revolution. 
  • Martin Luther King Jr. - sold the idea of civil disobedience. 
  • Harriet Tubman - sold to people the idea of running away toward freedom, despite the danger

 

 

They all had vision 

All of the individuals we’ve discussed are tied to a vision we are still talking about today. Websters defines vision as a thought, concept or object formed by the imagination. You can have a vision but that doesn’t necessarily mean your vision is going to compel people to take action. For people to join you, your vision must reveal and alleviate the pain. If people understand how your vision can help them, they will want to know more and be more compelled to come alongside. People need to understand why they should sacrifice their time, effort, and resources for your vision.  

Martin Luther King Jr., illustrated this beautifully in his speech,  I Have a Dream. He didn’t offer a detailed plan of execution, Martin Luther King Jr. simply stated his vision and invited our imaginations to join him in a better world.  

 

Sell a dream, sell a vision

If you want to become a great salesperson, you too must be able to learn to sell a dream. 

As scripts are recycled, sales reps are saying the same things. How are you going to stand out in the way you communicate with your prospects?  By recognizing your clients’ pain points and offering a vision of what life would be like without these challenges. Here’s an example: 

 

“60% of what your sales reps are doing today are non-sales related activities and will not generate business for  your organization. Based on what you’re paying them, that could cost you anywhere from $2000 to $5000 in wasted resources, not to mention lost opportunities. If we can demonstrate how we have helped other organizations like yourself show their sales reps how to become more productive and increase sales by 30 to 40% per rep. would you be open to learning more about that?”

 

You can do this in the form of a video or a phone call. Regardless of the platform you use, be able to paint a picture for your prospect. Speak about the pain that most sales leaders and other businesses face. Help the culture change within the organization by making them see the problem, quantifying their pain, and helping them see how bad it impacts their business. You are giving them a vision of what life could be like for their organization if they keep going in the same direction.  As the sales rep, show up as the solution.  

 

It’s a fact that not everyone will buy into your vision, just like the other individuals we’ve talked about in this series. The greatest sales people in history faced opposition but they showed up and they were brave. Be brave.

 

Do not fear the challenge

The second lesson from this series is to not fear the challenge of going against the status quo or your own organization. When organizations find themselves in a rut , they can do the same things over and over again even if they’re still not seeing positive results. Disrupt the rhythm by showing how you can provide the opportunity for these systems to get better. 

 

When you offer change, be respectful and be ready to show the data. Stand out from other sales reps by being prepared and taking chances.  

 

Welcoming the new series

The new series will be coming in after the month of March. We will be focusing on SaaS and we’ll be interviewing individuals who are in the SaaS world. This series is called BDR, business development representatives and it’ll be rolling out by April. We’ll be getting on people from Donald’s team. It’s almost like a reality TV show and they are going to talk about their journey and experiences as salespeople and how they were able to become successful. This series may run for six episodes and will be posted and played every Wednesday. 

 

“Best Seller In History Recap” episode resources 

If you want to hear more and review this series, you can just head on to The Sales Evangelist podcast site and type Best sellers in history series in the search bar. 

If you want more stories, you can just reach out to Donald. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning on February 14th and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1259.mp3
Category:Best Seller in History -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Selling SaaS To Doctors vs. Selling Traditional SaaS 

 

SaaS stands for Software as a Service. In this episode, Justin Welsh will teach us how to sell SaaS to doctors and how the language in these transactions can be applied in other areas of selling. 

 

Although Justin Welsh is an accomplished seller, he is also a buyer who makes note of his purchasing experiences.  He recalls one such experience, about eighteen months ago, when he went to the Atlantic Center Terminal to buy a new TV. He and his wife had just moved to a new apartment and Justin wanted a large 60” TV so he could enjoy college football. He went to the store and told the salesman exactly what he needed.  The salesman, however, had other plans. Justin no sooner had asked about the 60” TV before he was hearing about 65”, 67”, and 72” inches TV. Justin was even taken over to the curved and 3D TVs. Justin admits he was a little intimidated by such an aggressive sales tactic. He’d just wanted to get the TV he was ready to purchase so he and his friends could enjoy the game.  He didn’t buy a TV that day.

 

The good salesman

Justin, still needing a TV, eventually went back to the store and had a very different experience. A different salesman approached and asked Justin what he needed. Again, Justin said that he was interested in a 60’’ TV. Instead of being shown the selection right away,  he was asked a series of questions relevant to what he wanted. 

 

  • How big is your room?
  • What angle do you watch the game from?
  • Where are the windows in your room?
  • How much light do you have in the room?

 

At the end of that conversation, the salesman told him that he didn’t actually need a 60-inch TV, and that a 55-inch TV would work better for the space he had available. The salesman had considered Justin’s needs based on the information given to him and showed Justin he had his best interest at heart.  As a result, Justin was able to buy a 55-inch TV that was $300 below his budget. You can bet Justin will be looking for that salesman the next time he’s shopping again.

 

So who is Justin Welsh?

Justin Welsh is the Vice-President of Sales at a tech company called Patient Pop where he manages a strategy team of 30  people. In the last couple of years, they have grown about 400% and has become one of the fastest growing software as a service (SaaS) healthcare platforms. They have defined a new category of software called Software Category Practice Growth Platform. It essentially integrates with healthcare professionals to their electronic medical records and practice management systems. Patient Pop’s role is to manage the patient experience from the first impression online until the patient is in the exam room. 

 

The software picks up again after treatment. They manage and nurture the patient relationship to ensure that the patient continues to be a customer in the practice. Patient Pop is a tremendous opportunity to redefine and reshape the way that patients experience healthcare today. 

 

The basics of SaaS

Conducting a pharma sale is different from the usual product selling. In pharma sales, a sales rep goes into a doctor’s office where the doctor is the expert. They are the ones who know how to treat the patients. Pharma sales reps are looking at a healthcare discussion. They meet a doctor, discuss the drug they represent, discuss a treatment plan, the patient profile, and more. Their job is to be an influencer. You’re doing a good job when the doctors think about your product when they see a patient with the profile need that was outlined in the sales meeting. You want them to remember the drug and write the prescription for that drug.

 

Selling software is different. In selling the software, it’s the sales rep who is the expert.  They don’t help doctors treat their patients better from a medical perspective. The software addresses  the business side of the office. In order to talk to a doctor about his business, you need to be an expert, not just in selling, but about the product itself. 

 

Having the right approach

As a sales rep with expertise, when Justin approaches his doctors, he doesn’t just reveal the pain points. He makes sure clients are being approached with respect and discusses how his company can add value.  He knows that it’s mission critical to do research on potential clients,and study a healthcare provider’s online presence, so he can show up with solutions from that first conversation. 

 

For example, Justin’s team wants to talk to Dr. Smith so they do a thorough analysis on his private practice online to see the gaps in his strategies. A sales rep from his team then makes an initial call and says, “Hi, Dr. Smith. I know you’re busy but really quickly, I was doing some research on  your practice in terms of your online presence and I came across three specific things that I thought might be interesting to you…

 

This is why I’m calling your practice specifically. What I found is ___, ____, ____. Were you aware of these things? I’m not sure if those three things are impactful to what you’re looking to do or if you’re looking to grow the practice, but I’ve talked to other orthopedic surgeons like you who are looking to grow their business and those three things are generally things they'd like to fix. Does that sound like you? 

 

Great! What's the easiest way for me to get 10 minutes on your schedule so we can take a deeper dive, and see what else there is to fix? I can show you how we might be able to help.”

 

Different atmospheres

Pharma reps get about a month or two of training. They are equipped with some great studies. This is another difference between pharma sales and SaaS and there are more. 

When pharma reps walk into the practice, they’ve got great access and are able to talk with the provider. Their job is to move the percentage of prescriptions over time and that’s how they make money, by influencing the numbers. 

 

With SaaS, sales reps have continuous training. They utilize their LinkedIn, their new sources, and they keep up-to-date with the current trends. Their access to doctors is poor and they only have one or two chances to talk with physicians. If they blow that chance, they don’t get to walk back in the same clinic the following week. They need to move fast and they need to really show the physician’s future, in that first meeting, if they don’t choose to change to their software system. They can’t afford to act slowly and over time. They have to show up sharp and with expertise.  

 

The Sales Cycle 

While pharma rep sales contacts are ongoing, Justin’s team has to sell within a week or two. When you’re a pharma rep, there are multiple chances to influence a physician. If the job is being done well, habits are changed over time. A software sales rep needs to influence change immediately and make the most out of the very first meeting. 

 

When you talk to a doctor about their practice, the conversation is going to be focused on revenue.  Are they losing or not making as much? How does the software you offer make the process more efficient so more patients can be seen?  Once a sales rep understands the office’s capacity for seeing patients, they can quantify how much revenue is being lost and how much can be gained with the proposed services. 

 

Knowing when to call

It’s good to catch the physicians at the right time. The best hours to talk to physician directly are from 8AM - 9AM or 5 PM - 6 PM.  These are the times there are no patients and the receptionist has probably not clocked in. This is when the doctors are catching up with paperwork or dictations. When the phone rings, they are picking up the phone. 

 

Often times, doctors ask for your elevator pitch right away. You may give it right away or offer some credibility by sharing the common relationships of people or doctors you both know, especially if it’s a referral. 

 

Learn to say no

A good software sales rep knows how to tell a client no when it doesn’t benefit the client’s needs, and is ready to walk away if they aren’t ready to purchase with the conditions you’re offering.  If you do the right research, however, become an expert in your product, and know how to add value to their practice, you should be walking away with a closing.



“Selling SaaS To Doctors vs. Selling Traditional SaaS Solutions” episode resources

Stay up to date with Justin and his company. Find Justin Welsh on LinkedIn and Twitter. 

You can also check out his website, Patient Pop.  

If you want more stories, you can just reach out to Donald. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Direct download: TSE_1258.mp3
Category:SaaS, Software Sales -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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